Tag Archives: youtube

Beware Your Webcam! Overseas RAT Hackers Invade U.S. Homes

Webcams are among the latest tools being used by hackers,  who literally peek into bedrooms. This from a report, Selling Slaving,  just released by the Digital Citizens Alliance (DCA), focusing on a subset of hackers known as “ratters.”

The name is an acronym for “Remote Access Trojans,” an easily accessible type of malware that enables hackers to take control of individual computers from afar.

The computers ratters enlist in their efforts are known as slaves. DCA found international hackers invading the privacy of devices in 33 states, as well as other countries, with many providing commentary in Arabic about the response of their victims.

 

A RAT victim unknowingly captured by her own webcam. The video ran on YouTube – not the advertisement.

The malware is loaded by unknowing, often young users who frequent pirates sites like Pirate Bay and KickassTorrents. Once loaded the malware opens the door to everything on a computer, including its webcam. The invasion of privacy is made even worse by the fact that many ratters post videos, including victims’ names and IP addresses on videos posted on YouTube.

In a disturbing twist, many ratters make money through YouTube’s partner program, running ads on the videos for major brands, and splitting the revenues with YouTube.

The Digital Citizens Alliance also found that a number of ratters engage in the practice of “sextortion,” requiring victims to make videos or else face humiliation online though the use of information that they have acquired from their computers.

Here is a summary of some of the most compelling findings:

  • “Ratters” are aggressively launching 1:1 attacks on consumers and “slaving” their devices, is a growing problem. It takes ratters little time to slave hundreds of devices. From there, they can gather private information off those devices, which they can then use to “sextort” the owners of the devices. Some of the ratters’ victims have been forced to make videos where they must do as the ratters say or be publicly humiliated.
  • On the hackers’ chat room, Hack Forums, there are more than 1.5 million posts that discuss acquiring, creating, and spreading RATs (as of 7/22/15). Digital Citizens found one post where a Hack Forums participant offered access to the devices of girls for $5 and guys for $1. We found repeated posts where ratters said the best places to spread RATs were YouTube and content theft sites, like Pirate Bay and KickassTorrents.
  • Digital Citizens went on to YouTube and scoured through hundreds of ratters’ videos with ads from well-known companies – running alongside the videos. Many videos had the faces of victims and IP addresses to hacked computers. In fact, Digital Citizens researchers found IP addresses potentially connected to devices in 33 states and dozens of other countries.
  • On Hack Forums, ratters talked about how content theft sites, like Pirate Bay, and KickassTorrents, were great places from which to spread RATs.  Researchers also found YouTube videos demonstrating how to use content theft sites to trick victims into downloading dangerous malware.
  • Ratters can make money through YouTube Partner Program. If a ratter joins the YouTube Partner Program, and, like the videos in our report, their video is “approved” then it starts to be monetized. In the Partner Program, YouTube promises to split ad revenues with that approved videos for their traffic. You start getting views on YouTube, you start making money – potentially thousands of dollars. In a survey of 200 RAT videos Digital Citizens researchers found ads running on nearly 40 percent.

 

Will International Appeal Give Apple Music the Edge Over Spotify?

Apple Music launched last week with less fanfare than expected, perhaps a victim of early holiday travel ahead of U.S. Independence Day.

Regardless, it is the long haul that matters most to Apple, as the world’s most valuable brand attempts to claw back the early-mover advantage that Swedish rival Spotify has enjoyed – and exploited  – to date.

Part of that strategy is likely to be played out on the global stage, as Apple’s new streaming service is available in significantly more markets than its peers. 

 

For a quick comparison, Apple Music has launched in more than 100 countries, which is almost twice as many as Spotify currently operates in. Furthermore, there are a number of territories in which Apple has launched its service where neither Spotify nor any other notable competitors currently operate.

Perhaps most importantly of all, these are not all smaller territories with limited market potential.

Among the territories in which Apple Music will beat Spotify to the punch are India, Russia, Japan, and  Nigeria. Between these four alone, the number of potential consumers could stretch into the billions, although activating them inevitably poses a major challenge given prevailing levels of piracy and, with the exception of Japan, less mature streaming markets. This provides a stark contrast to the reverse situation for Spotify, wherein the only markets it will now operate without competition from Apple Music are Turkey, Taiwan and smaller European nations like Liechtenstein and Andorra.

The importance of this advantage cannot be overstated. For many consumers in these countries, which potentially hold the key to the global expansion of streaming music, Apple’s platform will be their first experience of the phenomenon. Given the game-changing nature of digital streaming, not to mention the fact that many hold it up as the long-term solution to piracy, the potential for Apple Music to take giant strides into these territories is just as crucial as its need to build a customer base in the United States, Europe, and Australia.

In June, Spotify announced that it has passed the 20 million mark in terms of paid subscribers, while its overall active user base now numbers more than 75 million globally. Although that growth rate is increasing quickly, Apple Music is not competing from a standing start. The hundreds of millions of active iTunes accounts the Cupertino company has on file provide a solid base to convert to its new service, in addition to the Beats Music users that it hopes to bring across from the service it purchased last year.

All of this sets the stage for an intriguing evolution of the streaming music space. The market, although relatively young, has been waiting for some time for Apple to enter the fray and challenge Spotify’s dominance. It is clearly a battle that Apple intends to win, if the brand’s commitment to pay artists for all streams during its three-month free trial period is anything to go by. That will cost Apple a pretty penny, but the company clearly believes the long-term pay off in terms of brand awareness and the associated loyalty will be worth it.

For artists, the hope has to be that Apple can use its extensive resources to raise awareness of streaming music services and increase . It this really is the piracy killer that many believe it to be, making streaming subscriptions a truly global trend will have everyone involved in the music business singing Apple’s praises.