Tag Archives: uploadin

MPAA Flags Global Offenders in its “Most Notorious Markets” List

A new infringement list created by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) underlines the global commitment required if creators in every country are to be protected from piracy on an international scale.

In a press release on Monday, the MPAA listed a number of sites, particularly in Russia and the Netherlands, that it classed as especially problematic in terms of online piracy.

Piracy demonstration international issue

MPAA list underlines the global piracy problem. | Image Credit: Wikimedia

Rarely far from the headlines, it comes as little surprise that sites in Russia, like the country’s Facebook equivalent VKontakte and the lesser known Rapidgator.net, are at the heart of a trend towards illegal direct downloads and using streaming cyberlockers to access unlicensed content.

But sites based in Europe are no less to blame, with Dutch site Uploaded.net and even Germany’s Netload.in featuring among a shortlist of what the MPAA calls the “World’s Most Notorious Markets.” The list has been submitted to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, following the office’s request for input from those familiar with the matter.

While the MPAA’s focus is inevitably devoted to the impact on the U.S. creative economy, its findings speak to the wider struggle facing creators around the world. All too often the sites that take their work without permission are based in countries where their creative reach ends

In an age of global connections and widespread Western co-operation on a number of international issues, it seems unthinkable that no consensus can be reached to take down notorious havens for piracy in locations like Germany, the Netherlands and New Zealand. With wider global concerns at play in Russia movement is perhaps less likely, although even there a commitment has been shown to clamp down on the theft of intellectual property. The country’s efforts have tended to fall down after the tough talk is done, however, as the case of major music labels being forced to take their own legal action against the aforementioned VKontakte demonstrates.

Though the global will may be present, it seems that effective action on the ground is not. It remains for the U.S. Trade Representative to escalate the issue, which requires not just national but international attention if creators in every country are to be effectively protected and receive the revenues they’re due.