Tag Archives: uk

U.S. Looks North of the Border for Anti-Piracy Inspiration

Hollywood is the envy of the world when it comes to making movies. In terms of protecting them once they are made, though? Well, we might need to start looking to the Great White North for our anti-piracy ideas, as a new program in Canada proves to be rather successful in curbing infringing activity.

 

After just a few months in operation, the new Canadian notice system is showing drops in piracy between 50-70 percent on some of the country’s most popular network providers. The system is rooted in Canada’s Copyright Modernization Act, through which ISPs can be required to deliver copyright infringement notices to customers when they themselves are made aware of infringing activity.

Closing the loop between the makers and monitors, the firm behind the initiative – and posting these impressive numbers – is Los Angeles-based rights corporation CEG TEK International.

The results in Canada are all the more surprising because of the mixed results typically associated with notice-based systems, whether they come via ISPs or directly from rights holders.

We all know the limitations of the U.S. DMCA system, whereby rights holders flag infringing content links to the sites that host them, only to see a new link pop up with the same content and the original poster rarely taken to task for the act.

Also common are systems based on infringement “strikes,” where an ISP does notify the infringing party and/or those who access the content. But a strike system is based on escalating warnings and has generally proved too lenient, both here at home, and abroad in countries like France and the UK. The French law in particular, known as HADOPI, was reversed in 2013 after its more severe punishments were poorly enforced and users frequently found a way around the system.

So what makes the Canadian notices system more successful than those that have gone before it?

It is still early days, but it seems the threat of financial penalties are a key motivator in changing behavior north of the border. More importantly, these are not the mind-boggling fees that we saw in the early days of piracy litigation. Rather they are more manageable fines for non-commercial copyright infringement, which give the recipient pause for thought without coming across as a draconian measure.

Even with the maximum cap at $5,000 for these fines, those going out to ISP customers are significantly less. Ranging from the low to mid-hundreds of dollars, the price is not financially crippling for the user but certainly send a message that, even when it can be easily accomplished, content theft remains a crime.

House of Cards Piracy Shows Why Legal Global Streaming Works

It’s a universal truth that where demand goes unsatisfied, piracy quickly follows. For the creative industries, there are high hopes that an equally predictable trend will unfold: where legal streaming services roll out, piracy quickly tails off.

It’s been a theme that characterized much of February for us, from the news that Norway, where streaming music services dominate, has seen a dramatic reduction in piracy, to the post-Oscars analysis of where Academy Award winning titles are available and how piracy spikes if they’re not.

House of Cards piracy is the latest example to underline this phenomenon, as season 3 of the Netflix original series prompted a surge in social media and viewing activity in markets where the platform is active, and soaring piracy levels in countries where it isn’t.

 

Season 3 was only released last Friday, yet unlicensed viewing in countries around the world already numbers in the six figures, with China heading the illegal access list at more then 60,000 downloads. That doesn’t begin to factor in a number of other methods of finding the program without paying for the privilege, as technology like VPN access helps viewers to bypass geographical restrictions and log in to the same version of Netflix made available to U.S. consumers.

Although there is also illegal access in countries where Netflix does operate successfully, not least the U.S. and United Kingdom, the general consensus is that any market will have some amount of residual piracy.

While that element needs to be tackled with more familiar education and enforcement tactics, promoting legal access channels and penalizing where pirates knowingly disregard them, the most promising new prong in fighting copyright infringement is rolling out legitimate streaming services in markets where they don’t currently operate.

In the case of House of Cards this would of course be Netflix, first and foremost, although it isn’t hard to imagine a scenario in which the company licenses such a popular title to another service if it can’t get into the market itself. China springs to mind in the first instance, given the censorship issues and other red tape for American companies operating in the country, but there are enough other international markets in which Netflix isn’t being compensated at all for its hit production and would surely love to bridge the gap with licensing income.

Continent of Australia from space. Australia i...

Continent of Australia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Meanwhile it’s Australia that provides the most immediate case study of how introducing a legal viewing alternative will impact piracy levels. Frequently found atop the illegal viewing figures despite its relatively small consumer base, the country saw House of Cards piracy almost on a par with China.

Here, however, Netflix seems all set to launch this month, giving consumers almost no time to wait for the popular title and everything else that the company’s expansive archives will bring.

If Australians decide that convenience (and, we would hope, copyright) trump the awkward access of covert connections and malware-plagued piracy sites, then piracy levels should decline.  The experiment is ongoing, but the early results are promising that legitimate digital channels can connect viewers around the world to content they love, without having to resort to illicit and unreliable access points to get it.

 

As Legal Viewing Options Grow Globally, Excuses for Piracy Recede

Following a study by KMPG earlier this year that showed the vast majority of popular or critically-acclaimed movies are legally available online in the U.S., the same research criteria have been applied across the Atlantic.

The results? Very similar availability and an ever-expanding universe of outstanding entertainment for British viewers, all instantly accessible via legitimate online services.

Here are some of the report’s headlines for the UK market:

  • All of the top 100 movies at the 2012 box office are offered on at least one of the services;
  • 96% of the country’s all time box office hits are offered on at least one of the services;
  • 90% of independent films were available on at least one service;
  • 75% of top UK 100 TV shows were also available on at least one service.

In actual fact many of the numbers above could be higher as the study doesn’t take into account options like time-shifted viewing available from cable providers or similar services that act as content recorders.

All in all, the findings on both sides of the Atlantic mirror one another and encompass a trend that is inevitably going global. Thousands of services are available across Europe and the incentive for the most successful of them to expand into other international markets is clear. Legal options for the most in-demand and culturally valuable entertainment are coming online all the time, neutralizing one of the last lingering excuses for those who typically take it for free.

The hope for creative industries around the world will be that the rising popularity of legal online entertainment, which provide quick, easy access and improve the consumer’s experience compared to illegal options, will persuade those in more notorious markets to move away from piracy.

If the success of legitimate channels of content consumption continues to grow by turning torrents and illegal downloads into real revenue, the investment in that content and those who create it will be all the greater.