Tag Archives: technology

Spain Pushes Google’s Buttons Over News Content

Europe has long held a healthy concern about the power wielded by search giant Google. With more than 80% market share and increasingly influential in all areas of technology, from desktop to mobile, browser to cloud computing, the company has found opposition mounting around the European Union in various guises.

Now it’s the turn of Spain, but the country’s government appears to have gone too far with its attempt to squeeze Google over its News product.

The so-called “Google tax,” which was passed last week, intends to collect revenue from online news providers who aggregate headlines from Spanish media outlets. It goes into effect on January 1st, 2015, but Google chose to act preemptively to avoid charges and earlier today shut down its news item content from Spanish content providers.

The law has been widely criticized by journalists, especially in the technology sector, for being over prescriptive and getting its just desserts with Google pulling the plug on a product that provides valuable traffic to the country’s publications. That criticism largely fails to delve into the nuance of intellectual property, however, and present the other side of the argument that publishers should have a right to dictate how and when their content is used.

In some cases the news that Google presents may in itself stand as a piece of content, in which case it benefits the search engine but not the publication whose headlines it has pulled. Spain’s law does go too far in the other direction though, making payments mandatory and giving publishers no option to decide that they want to give away these snippets in exchange for the traffic that a search engine can send them.

For its part Google’s reasoning that it makes no money on news, while accurate in fact, seems somewhat disingenuous. Although its News section makes no revenue from ads directly, it’s certainly a factor that attracts users who go on to search the company’s other listings, building its brand and generating revenue on ad clicks in those paid sections. In that sense at least, Google is playing off the content of others – in this case snippets of their reports – in order to bring in the eyeballs that swell its allure for advertisers.

More than anything else this case demonstrates just how fine a line content creators now walk, in terms of monetizing what they create directly versus giving elements of it away for free in order to play the long game. For news sites that means traffic to sell its adverts or subscriptions for more. As that traffic is likely to dip substantially without Google in the weeks and months to come, it’s understandable why Spanish publishers are quickly backtracking on this attempt to push Google’s buttons.

International Anticipation Grows as TPP Heads to DC

The next round of talks toward the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) take place in Washington DC early next month and the general feeling seems to be that negotiations are progressing very well.

In our last look at the TPP we focused mostly on copyright protection, but the potential of this agreement is even wider than that, as a number of insightful articles this week reveal.

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Image Credit: Wes Peck

Firstly, an article by the Copyright Alliance explains how agreements such as this set the stage for creative expression around the world.

Citing the example of a Mexican journalist who uses her position to expose injustice and illegal activity in her country, Sofia Castillo uncovers how co-operative efforts like those that the TPP will commit national governments to actually fgo further and protect free speech. Or to use Sofia’s more eloquent term, trade agreements have the power to be “engines of freedom of expression.”   

In another high profile area of guarding intellectual property, a Forbes piece lays out how major trade agreements that encompass copyright stand to “meaningfully improve our nation’s economic future,” and raises the issue of patent protection.

Often linked to lucrative new technology, patents are among the most valuable protective measures that creators can put in place to protect their ideas. With international enforcement, however, inventions are still ripe for theft and “patent trolling,” a practice widely reported in recent years that has a similar effect of draining legitimate creators of their rightful revenue.

Both of these creative arenas (and more) stand to benefit greatly from the international co-operation contained within the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

By protecting intellectual property and creative expression across international boundaries we in turn open up an encouraging, collaborative environment for our most talented artists and inventors to make the most of their gifts. In doing so, trade agreements like the TPP offer unique opportunities to bolster our artistic and economic futures in one fell swoop.

 

 

TPP Trade Negotiations Re-open in Australia

The latest round of talks to negotiate the Trans-Pacific Partnership began in Canberra, Australia yesterday, bringing the twelve participating nations back together to discuss wide-ranging trade issues.

The negotiations will have a significant impact on how the major nations handle intellectual property rights, among other things, and an early leak of the copyright proposals has stoked online opinion, even before any clear consensus has been reached by participants.

Canberra Australia

Canberra Parliament | Image Credit: Brenden Ashton

 

The provisions include a standard copyright term, generally mooted as life of the creator plus somewhere between 50-100 years, measures to prevent getting around Digital Rights Management systems designed to prevent piracy, and a form of penalizing Internet Service Providers (ISPs) for illegal access that occurs through the connections they run.

On the latter point participating nations are being particularly careful. Despite feeling that ISPs have a supporting role to play in enforcing intellectual property law, the tendency towards draconian measures such as long term disconnections and jail time has long since passed. The desire now, as indicated by Australia’s attempts to put cost limits in place and the wider desire for some form of intermediary “safe harbor,” is to bring ISPs more effectively into the fight for copyright protection. This is something that their business depends on, given how much content is consumed online and the increasing popularity of streaming music and movies.

As early drafts of the proposal confirm, the end game here is to create “remedies for rights holders to address copyright infringement in the online environment.” This has to be a good thing for creative rights, but it hasn’t been a smooth ride for the TPP so far.

Even with opposition to the way the negotiations are being held behind closed doors (not at all irregular for early draft international treaties) and the concern that any legislation will overreach (though individual nations will still be responsible for how they integrate any requirements into their own legal systems), the outcome of the TPP should accomplish a long overlooked goal: to help creators take control of their intellectual property rights beyond their own borders.